Tag Archives: graphic novel

Video: Dakini’s Theme

Video

Music from KuruCircus Event at CounterCulture, Bangalore! And Ari managed to do something cool with the shitty video I shot.

Dance interpretation of our protagonist Dakini’s descent into the darkness, her illumination by the Aghori philosophy and her eventual return to Calcutta to fulfill her destiny.

Dancer Extraordinaire: Swapna Shree Bhasi.

Link

The Kuru Chronicles@ Time Out Magazine Bangalore

Old news. But in order to properly chronicle the Chronicles, I must post. Late but at least never, right?

I remember being STOKED as hell that we were featured in Time Out!

Inspiration

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A few weeks ago, a friend of mine sent me to Mexican author Perez-Reverte’s blog. The blog is in Spanish (I Google Translate it to English) and it’s about his notes on a novel that he is currently writing. I thought the idea of annotating a novel in progress was pretty neat. I like the idea of giving your readers and your future self a kind of pathway into your creative process. It’s something I’ve been thinking about more and more. Most of the time, when I write something I like, it’s like magic. I have no idea where it came from. It seems, sometimes, as if the words, sentences, ideas are spilling out of my fingers. It feels as if the story is this thing that is alive.

Getting back to Perez, the Google Translate does a kidn of sub-par job but this sentence captured me: “A novel does not end up hating you as you write, but while you correct.” Replace ‘novel’ with ‘short story’ and he’s still right!

Anyway, that a bit heavy-ish, so here’s my current obsession to take the edge off all that: Marley singing ‘Is this love?’. Right now, I’m listening to this song on an insane, endless loop and writing Chapter 1 of Book 2 of the Kuru Chronicles called ‘The Communist’ which is about a pot-smokin’, Marley lovin’ Bengali Communist.

Press: The Kuru Chronicles Updates!

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It’s been a ridiculous month and a half. I moved to NY, started school, started work and I still have ALL my writing projects. I’ve been stressing like a champion so it was freaking awesome to wake up this morning to see that KURU GOT PRESS!!

Here‘s an interview with Ari by Platform Magazine.

And here’s a blog post at deepad. Scroll down a ways to see the bit about Kuru Chronicles. The funniest part is when the author refers to me as (lady author!). Ha ha.

Thanks to both Platform and Deepad for the props. This is the kind of stuff that keeps us going when we’re stuck in a dark room filled with ink.

Review: Tina’s Mouth: An Existential Comic Diary

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New review! This time I had a chance to read Keshni Kashyap‘s witty comic ‘Tina’s Mouth- an Existential Comic Diary‘. It’s about an Indian-American high school student whose English project is to keep a diary on existentialism.

I went to some pretty straight forward schools in India where all we did was sit and listen to our teachers read aloud from textbooks. It was only until I moved to Madras and went to Sishya that I was in a school where teachers worked really hard to engage us. Point being, I really like how in this book the teacher tries to engage his students by creating innovative projects.

I mean existentialism is a pretty heavy topic.

My first encounter with it was when I was read Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder, which is basically a book about a young girl who starts receiving mysterious postcards from an anonymous source. The first one simply asks, ‘Who are you?’ The book then sees Sophie pretty much take a whirlwind tour of the history of philosophy. Her anonymous source is a philosopher called Albert Knox (whom she doesn’t meet or know anything about yet) and he acts as her philosophy tutor teaching her about all the great philosophers from Plato to Descartes and Kierkegaard. It was very engaging and to me, at the time 17, pretty mind-blowing. The climax- about the nature of reality, gave me goosebumps.

I’m not sure how much I would like the book as an adult though and that’s the same way I felt about Tina’s Mouth. I think, though, that teenagers would like it. The book greatest strength is Kashyap’s writing.

Here’s an excerpt of my review.

Fifteen-year-old Tina Malhotra’s life is thrown for a loop when her best friend since kindergarten, Alex, deserts her and starts hanging out with the popular kids. Alone but defiant, Tina chooses to spend her time on her existentialist diary — a project created by her teacher for his English class. Spouting wisdom straight from Jean Paul Sartre’s books, Tina attempts to navigate high school and life using Sartre as inspiration, mentor, and friend. Although Tina is certain that she is not like any of the other teenagers in her school, the existentialist project does spur her on a journey of self discovery. Interestingly, this self-discovery revolves around the one obsession that she does share with all the other teenage girls in her school: the hallowed, mysterious and magical first kiss. Or, in Tina’s case, the lack of one.”

Click here to read the full review at Hyphen Magazine.